How to Choose Loose Tube And Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable? - Baudcom

How to Choose Loose Tube And Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable?

Don’t know how to choose loose tube and tight buffered optic fiber cable?
After reading this article, you will definitely have a good harvest between loose tube and tight buffered fiber optic cable as belows:
You can know how to choose them,
the key differences between them,
the most basic definitions of them.

How to choose Loose Tube and Tight Buffered  Fiber Optic Cable ?

Loose Tube and Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable

Loose Tube and Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable are two structural forms of optical cables.

1.Tight Buffered Fiber Cable

Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable, also known as riser or fiber optic distribution cable, is primarily used in buildings and campuses, often installed in cable trays or ducts.Therefore, they are suitable for use in internal factories or building networks. These cables usually have an LSZH jacket.

Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable, on the other hand, are great for indoor use and medium-length LAN/WAN connections because they’re a more robust option. Another advantage of tight buffered  cable is that they are easier to install as there is no gel to clean up afterward.They do not require a fan-out kit for splicing or termination, as you can crimp the connector directly onto each fiber.

Loose Tube use in indoor

2.Loose Tube

Loose Tube Fiber Optic Cable are better for outdoors and harsh environments because they hold the fiber inside a gel that protects the fiber from water and temperature changes.
These cables should not be routed through multiple corners or bends, as this can damage the gel and expose the core. Due to the diameter of the optical fibers used in Loose Tube  Cable, they typically hold more fibers than Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable.

The type of outer sheath and material used is also suitable for exterior or outdoor plant use.
It offers waterproof tape, rodent protection (such as steel wire armor), termite protection, sacrificial sheathing, and many other potential advantages when used outdoors or in harsh environments, usually, most outdoor cables use the PE nylon outer jacket.

Key differences between Loose Tube and Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable

1.Design

The main difference between them is the design of the cable.
(1)In tight buffered fiber optic cables, there is no gap between the core coating and cladding.
(2)Loose Tube Fiber Optic Cables have gaps that are either filled with gel or are loosely distributed throughout the cable.

Loose Tube and Tight Buffered structure

2.Structure

(1)Loose Tube Fiber Optic Cables are composed of multiple 250 um fiber cores and have only one outer protective layer.
(2)Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable typically consists of 900 um buffered fiber and have two layers of aramid yarn (one around the fibre core and another outer layer).

Loose Tube and Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable are two structural forms of optical cables. Let's introduce and learn how to choose and apply.

3.Cost

The cost of loose tube cables may vary depending on factors such as fiber count, specifications, and the level of protection.
(1)Loose tube cables for outdoor use can range from $0.30 to $2.00 per foot or more, depending on fiber count, specific protective features, etc.For a 432-fiber cable, this could be anywhere from approximately $130 to $864 for a 1000-foot length.

(2)Tight-buffered cables for indoor use are generally more cost-effective and can range from $0.10 to $0.50 per foot or more.
A 432-fiber tight-buffered cable of 1000 feet might cost around $43 to $216 or more.

Loose Tube and Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable are two structural forms of optical cables. Let's introduce and learn how to choose and apply

4.Flexibility

(1)Loose tube cables offer flexibility due to the individual buffer tubes that encase the fibers.This design allows them to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction.

(2)Tight-buffered cables are less flexible due to the tight adhesion of the buffer layer directly to the fibers.
They are designed for applications where flexibility isn’t a priority.

5.Applications

(1)Loose tube cables are designed for outdoor and harsh conditions as they offer flexibility and protection against environmental factors.
They are often used in underground, aerial, underwater, and duct installations.

(2)Tight-buffered cables are intended for indoor and controlled environments.They offer protection and ease of termination. They are commonly used in indoor networking, LANs, building-to-building connections, data centers, and structured cabling.

Definition of Loose Tube and Tight Buffered fiber optic cabletwo cable

(1)Briefly understand the loose tube cable.

Loose Tube Fiber Optic Cable have only one outer protective layer.

They are composed of multiple 250 um fiber cores and manufactured in two ways: gel-filled and dry.

Dry Loose Tube Fiber Optic Cable is similar but retains its

waterproofing capabilities with an additional internal protective

layer.To provide greater protection, the outer tube can be made from

a stronger or semi-rigid material to accommodate harsher

environments or where cable contact is common.

(2)Briefly understand the tight buffered cable

Tight Buffered Fiber Optic Cable typically consists of 900 um

buffered fiber surrounded by aramid yarn or E-glass reinforcement

in a halogen-free outer jacket.

They can be used indoors and outdoors and are designed so that the

buffer material is in direct contact with the optical fiber.

There are two main types of tight-buffered cable structures, branch

cable structures (also known as fan-out cables) and distributed

structures.Distribution cables are designed to be more compact than

distribution structures, but the tight-buffered fibers inside the cable

are only bundled in a single outer jacket for protection.

Conclusion

The loose-tube cable is for long-distance outdoor applications, while the tight-buffered cable is usually used for moderate length indoor applications

If you still don’t know how to choose, you can contact Baudcom and we will give you the most perfect solution to meet your needs.

  Loose-tube Fiber Optic cable Tight-buffered Fiber Optic Cable
Fiber size 250µm fiber 900µm fiber
Main use outdoor indoor
Waterproof material used waterproof gel acrylic coating
Place with many bends not suitable suitable
Underwater application not suitable suitable
Better place than the other higher density higher flexibility
better temperature properties higher tensile strength
smaller size easier termination and splicing

Post time:2024-03-24

Testimonials

Lomoveishiy – Finland

I needed those to connect my PC on the third floor to have internet access in that room, and ISP installed their modem on the first floor only. After dropping fiber patch cables, plugged in all cables into these media converters at both sides, and link came up instantly. Was much easier than I thought!

Raymond – USA

Great experience – units worked straight out of the box – just needed plug in cables and we were done. I also like the possibility to enable jumbo frames, while we do not have a need for this feature at the current moment it’s great to have this option.

Recent Blog

View More+

Leave Your Message